Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an empirically supported treatment designed to help people manage overwhelming feelings and self-defeating behaviors. These feelings and behaviors may create major challenges in life (such as angry outbursts, violence, depression, immobility and avoidance by suicide attempts, substance abuse, and eating disorders). DBT encompasses core modules of mindfulness, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and interpersonal effectiveness skills training. The emphasis is on building and enhancing skills to regulate emotions, deal with the distressing situations, and improve relationships. DBT was invented by Dr. Marsha Linehan, a psychologist, who used her own insights from living successfully with Borderline Personality Disorder to develop this novel therapy. In its standard form, there are four components of DBT: skills training group, individual treatment, DBT phone coaching, and consultation team.

Trauma Center-Justice Resource Institute

The Linehan Institute

DBT Fact Sheet – NAMI

Trauma Recovery and Empowerment Profile (TREP)

TREM is a fully manualized 24- to 29-session group intervention for women who survived trauma and have substance use and/or mental health conditions. This model draws on cognitive–behavioral, skills training, and psychoeducational techniques to address recovery and healing from sexual, physical, and emotional abuse. TREM consists of three major parts. The first section, on empowerment, helps group members learn strategies for self-comfort and accurate self-monitoring as well as ways to establish safe physical and emotional boundaries. The second component of TREM focuses more directly on trauma experience and its consequences. In the third section, focus shifts explicitly to skills building. These sessions include emphases on communication style, decision-making, regulating overwhelming feelings, and establishing safer, more reciprocal relationships.

Adult women with histories of trauma.

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The Associative Skills Model: Taking Charge of Change; The Trouble with Feelings; and Boundaries, Precious Boundaries

This three-module model, which can be taught on a flexible time and content-specific basis, teaches a basic trauma informed cognitive framework with accompanying skills. The premise is that the developmental disruptions of childhood trauma often prevent the development of a coherent frame of reference for three major areas impacted by trauma: the ability to cope with change in constructive ways; to identify, respond to and modulate affect, and the ability to identify, explore, set and change basic boundaries. Each module can be presented in a four-hour or one day format. An overview of all three, without skill development, is available as a one day program.

http://www.ct.gov/dmhas/lib/dmhas/trauma/TraumaModels.pdf

Safety, Mentoring, Advocacy, Recovery and Treatment (SMART)

The Safety, Mentoring, Advocacy, Recovery, and Treatment (SMART) model developed by a team of clinicians at the Kennedy Krieger Institute Family Center is a structured, phase-based, abuse-focused, treatment approach to address the emotional and behavioral needs of young children with a history of sexual abuse exhibiting problematic sexual behavior (PSB). A major premise of the model is that the PSB stems from emotional responses to the prior child sexual abuse causing the child to form cognitive distortions about themselves, others, and the world around them. A unique feature of the model is the formation of parallel narratives of the child’s experiences as a victim and as one who victimizes others. Children are supported to examine their roles and perceptions associated with each of these experiences. Clinicians guide children and their families through this process and provide the context for comparison leading to the integration of these experiences into a single narrative. The SMART model consists of three clinically essential phases: Safety and Stabilization, Triggers/Integration, and Re-Socialization. The SMART model utilizes individual, family, and group therapy simultaneously.

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Prolonged Exposure Therapy for Adolescents with PTSD (PE-A)

The treatment is designed for male and female adolescents aged 13-17 but has also been implemented with younger children. The pilot data were collected in a Philadelphia urban rape crisis center specializing in the treatment of adults and children who have been sexually assaulted, and in a hospital based clinic in Israel where patients experienced a variety of traumatic events including sexual assault and abuse, motor vehicle accidents, and terror attacks. Clients were predominantly African American and White in the American sample, and White in the Israeli sample. The manual is in English and has been translated into Hebrew.

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Alternatives to Seclusion and Restraint

Seclusion and restraint were once perceived as therapeutic practices in the treatment of people with mental and/or substance use disorders. Today, these methods are viewed as traumatizing practices and are only to be used as a last resort when less-restrictive measures have failed and safety is at severe risk.

For more information on alternatives to seclusion and restraint:

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Managing Traumatic Stress Through Art

Three art therapists have collaborated to produce this unique workbook. Designed especially for trauma survivors, Managing Traumatic Stress Through Art introduces inventive ways to understand, manage, and transform the after effects of trauma. This dynamic workbook consists of carefully structured step-by-step art projects, augmented by tear out images, and writing experiences. The book’s first section, Developing Basic Tools For Managing Stress, is devoted to establishing a safe framework for trauma resolution. The second section, Acknowledging and Regulating Your Emotions, helps the trauma survivor to make sense of overwhelming emotional experiences. The final section, Being and Functioning in the World, focuses on self and relational development, leading into the future.

No specific age/population. Can be used in individual or group therapy. The art experiences are broad enough to be of value to survivors of a wide variety of traumatic experiences, ranging from childhood abuse to accidents to disabling mental illness.

Managing-Traumatic-Stress-Through-Art

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Healing the Trauma of Abuse: A Woman’s Workbook

Mary Ellen Copeland co-authored the book Healing the Trauma of Abuse: A Gentle Woman’s Guide with Maxine Harris of Community Connections in Washington, DC. This important self-help book describes a weekly lesson process that women can use to relieve the effects of trauma in their lives, either when working in a group, with a counselor, or when, as many women must do, working on their own. It rebuilds self-esteem and gives back the personal power, trust and sense of connection that are taken away by a traumatic experience.

This book is based on the findings of an intensive study of strategies that help women who have been traumatized to heal from the effects of this trauma and make their lives the way they want them to be.

Individuals that want to work through trauma more informally. People that want to start a group, or work with a close friend.

Group Intervention for Children of Mothers with Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Abuse

This is a structured, children’s skills building group intervention that was developed as part of the SAMHSA Women, Co-Occurring Disorders and Violence Children’s Subset Study.

Children with mothers who have co-occuring mental health and substance abuse issues; two age groups 5-7 and 8-10.

Contact Information: To obtain the curriculum Group work with Children of Battered Women: A Practitioner’s Manual by Einat Peled and Diane Davis as adapted by The Coordinating Center and the Children’s Subcommittee for the Women, Co-Occurring Disorders and Violence Study, visit books.google.com.

ATRIUM – Addictions and Trauma Recovery Integration Model

ATRIUM is a 12-session recovery model designed for groups as well as for individuals and their therapists and counselors. The acronym, ATRIUM, is meant to suggest that the recovery groups are a starting point for healing and recovery. This model has been used in local prisons, jail diversion projects, AIDS programs, and drop-in centers for survivors. ATRIUM is a model intended to bring together peer support, psycho-education, interpersonal skills training, meditation, creative expression, spirituality, and community action to support survivors in addressing and healing from trauma.

Designed to serve survivors of sexual and physical abuse, those with substance abuse and other addictive behaviors, those who are actively engaged in harmful relationships, who self-injure, have serious psychiatric diagnoses, and for those who enact violence and abuse against others.